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Mobile school for Sandawe agro-pastoralists

People in the so-called "third world" are especially vulnerable to food fraud. Many have no choice but to buy their staple foods on the black market. Those foods are often inferiour, adulterated or harmful to health. | © Veterinarians without Borders
People in the so-called "third world" are especially vulnerable to food fraud. Many have no choice but to buy their staple foods on the black market. Those foods are often inferiour, adulterated or harmful to health. | © Veterinarians without Borders

Global food fraud - time for action!

For several years, Veterinarians without Borders has been tracking global food fraud. In 2008, we managed to uncover a food scandal about milk powder in Africa contaminated with melamine and lead. Our research in this field regularly takes us to the slums of African megacities. In Africa alone, around 300 million people live in slums. This corresponds to the total population of Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Poland and Austria!

Slum residents are sourcing their staples on the black market. Many of these foods are inferior, adulterated or harmful to health. Especially the market for milk powder and infant formula is very vulnerable to fraud. For example, cheap urea or melamine are mixed with milk powder to fake an increased protein content, or the highly toxic and carcinogenic formalin to ensure longer shelf life.

Our goal is to hold workshops on food fraud and conduct investigations in the poorest regions of the world. In cooperation with local food control authorities and universities, we train experienced professionals. They get the know-how necessary to detect food fraud and take samples locally and independently.

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NACHRICHTEN

19.02.21:

Meshack Dionis attended our trainings last year. During our visit he showed us his pearl millet field and then planted a fig seedling. © | Veterinarians without Borders

Mobile agricultural school is now in its third year

Our project to help small-scale farmers in Tanzania in the form of a mobile school has entered its...

05.02.21:

Hirtenvölker, wie die Maasai, pflegen ein sehr inniges Verhältnis zur Natur und ihren Tieren. | © Tierärzte ohne Grenzen

Wussten Sie schon, dass Pastoralisten ein Viertel aller Landflächen weltweit beweiden?

So leisten Hirten weltweit einen wesentlichen Beitrag zur Ernährungssicherheit selbst in den...

04.02.21:

Die pastorale Lebensform ist eine der ältesten, die wir kennen, und ist dennoch richtungsweisend für unsere Zukunft. | © Tierärzte ohne Grenzen

Würden Sie beim Begriff „Ökosystemdienstleister“ an Hirten denken?

Nein? Das wäre jedoch durchaus naheliegend. Denn Hirtenvölker pflegen eine Lebensweise, die...

Weitere News

VIDEOCLIPS

Steam cooking in the traditional way

Sweet potatoes are very popular in Africa. In Tanzania, many small traders sell steamed sweet...

John Laffa sends Christmas greetings from Tanzania

Our Tanzanian employee John Laffa wishes all supporters and friends of Veterinarians without...

Maasai student Lucas Moreto successfully finishes diploma course!

We congratulate our Maasai student Lucas Moreto! As reported, Lucas is studying law at the TUDARCO...

Weitere Clips
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VSF International